Developing Clojure in Vim (2018 edition)

When I wrote about developing Clojure in Vim for the first time, I was still early in my journey. For years, I’d only been able to tinker with Clojure in my free time and I was never able to really use it for anything large. Well, now I’m 5 or so months into using it full time and I’m really enjoying the development experience. So I thought I’d update my previous post with what my Vim configuration looks like now.
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Obsessing over multiple projects

In my new job, I’ve switched each project being a unique combination of git repositories1 to all projects being in just a few repositories. For instance, my primary codebase consists of two repositories, one for the frontend and one for the backend. As time progresses, I work on multiple (mostly) independent projects in each repo, each one on its own branch. Each project requires a different constellation of files, sometimes organized in radically different ways in my Vim tabs.
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My tmux configuration, refined

When I wrote about tmux for the first time, I was just getting into the idea of nesting sessions. I ran a local tmux session that wrapped remote tmux sessions for more than a year before I switched it up again. I added another level. Background I originally started nesting tmux sessions so that I wouldn’t have to use tabs in Terminal to keep track of different remote tmux sessions. This allowed me to connect to my work machine from home and get my entire working session instantly.
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Setting up Vim for Clojure

I’ve been experimenting with Clojure lately. A few of my coworkers had begun the discovery process as well, so I suggested that we have a weekly show-and-tell, because a little accountability and audience can turn wishes into action. Naturally, I looked around for plug-ins that would be of use in my editor of choice. Here’s what I have installed: vim-clojure-static - Syntax highlighting and indentation vim-fireplace - Slick repl integration and hot code reload rainbow_parentheses.
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A script to ease SCP use

Since I work on remote systems all the time, I use SCP repeatedly to transfer files around. One of the more cumbersome tasks is specifying the remote file or directory location. So I wrote a helper script to make it easier. It’s called scptarget, and it generates targets for SCP, either the source or the destination. For instance, if I want to copy a file down from a remote server, I run scptarget like this and copy the output:
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Easy development with git_backup

I’ve been using git_backup to back up the websites I run for quite a while now. It works well and I only need to scan the daily cron emails to see if the backup went well or if there were any odd files changed the day before. One thing that I didn’t expect when I started using it was how it would enable developing those websites in a sandbox without any danger of affecting the production instances.
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My tmux configuration

Update: I refined my configuration. See it here. For the longest time, I was a screen user. Then, a little while ago, I discovered tmux, the next generation terminal multiplexer. Not only is it easier to search for on google, it has a rich and consistent configuration language. I’ve figured out a rather unique tmux configuration and I wanted to share it. Background Originally, I just used tmux on remote servers to control several windows.
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remotecopy - copy from remote terminals into your local clipboard

Problem I copy and paste all the time. Most of the time, I copy short pieces of information that are too long to type (I’m lazy) but too short to setup anything more complex (wget, scp, etc.). For a while, this was fine as most of my copy targets were either local to my system or in a terminal window on a remote server. However, as I increased my use of splits in tmux and windows in vim, highlighting remote text with my mouse became horribly cumbersome.
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dfm - a utility to manage dotfiles

I have quite a few dotfiles. I have so many that keeping them in sync is impossible with conventional methods. So, I turned to my old friend: version control. For a while, I kept them in subversion at work. This worked well as that was where I spent most of my time. Recently, however, I’ve wanted those same dotfiles to be available at home and other non-work areas. So, I investigated moving them over to a git repository.
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Really Groking Git

I’ve been using git for a while now, and I’m just getting to the point where I can think in it. It’s the same as learning a new spoken language. I took three years of Spanish in high school, so I knew most of the rules and could translate back and forth to English, but I never really learned to think in Spanish (as opposed to thinking in English and then quickly translating).
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