Migrating to Hugo

Octopress -> Hugo.
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Envbox: Secure Key Storage

I wrote a few months ago about envbox, and I can say that it has proved useful to me many times over. One thing that felt unfinished was the way that envbox stores the key that it uses to encrypt all of the environment variables. It did move the problem from the shell/history to one of system security, which was acceptable. But there are better ways of storing credentials on most systems.
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Developing Clojure in Vim (2018 edition)

When I wrote about developing Clojure in Vim for the first time, I was still early in my journey. For years, I’d only been able to tinker with Clojure in my free time and I was never able to really use it for anything large. Well, now I’m 5 or so months into using it full time and I’m really enjoying the development experience. So I thought I’d update my previous post with what my Vim configuration looks like now.
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Obsessing over multiple projects

In my new job, I’ve switched each project being a unique combination of git repositories1 to all projects being in just a few repositories. For instance, my primary codebase consists of two repositories, one for the frontend and one for the backend. As time progresses, I work on multiple (mostly) independent projects in each repo, each one on its own branch. Each project requires a different constellation of files, sometimes organized in radically different ways in my Vim tabs.
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outputdiff: easily spot differences in command output

When I’m in front of a computer, I spend much of my time at the command line, logged into various systems, running commands. Now, there are two basic categories of commands: Commands that change - install a package, add a firewall rule, restart a service Commands that report - list installed packages, list firewall rules, list running services This post is about making the second category of commands more useful.
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envbox: keeping secret environment variables secure

In my day to day work and evening and weekend side work, I do most almost all of my development working on remote systems. This has a number of advantages that are for another post, but this post is about one of the limitations. Most developers have a tool belt that they’re continually improving, and as I work on mine I come across commands - like hub that require1 putting a secret value into an environment variable, usually for authentication.
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My note-taking workflow

A few people have asked about my note-taking workflow and it’s been quite useful to me, so I thought I would describe what works for me. I’ve tried several of the popular note-taking tools out there and found them overbearing or over-engineered. I just wanted something simple, without lock-in or a crazy data format. So my notes are just a tree of files. Yup, just directories and files. It isn’t novel or revolutionary.
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My tmux configuration, refined

When I wrote about tmux for the first time, I was just getting into the idea of nesting sessions. I ran a local tmux session that wrapped remote tmux sessions for more than a year before I switched it up again. I added another level. Background I originally started nesting tmux sessions so that I wouldn’t have to use tabs in Terminal to keep track of different remote tmux sessions. This allowed me to connect to my work machine from home and get my entire working session instantly.
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Talk Notes: February 2014

I was out of town two of the Fridays this month, so I was only able to get two talks in: Clojure core.async - Continuing in my fascination with Clojure, I picked this talk to explore the non-Java techniques for handling concurrency. I’m familiar with CSP from my Go experience, and it was interesting to hear Clojure’s take on the same foundation. Clojure also implements a macro that turns the spaghetti code that is callbacks into a sequential function that still operates asynchronously.
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Setting up Vim for Clojure

I’ve been experimenting with Clojure lately. A few of my coworkers had begun the discovery process as well, so I suggested that we have a weekly show-and-tell, because a little accountability and audience can turn wishes into action. Naturally, I looked around for plug-ins that would be of use in my editor of choice. Here’s what I have installed: vim-clojure-static - Syntax highlighting and indentation vim-fireplace - Slick repl integration and hot code reload rainbow_parentheses.
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